Andrew Norelli: Cut Above Stupid

By | June 3, 2011 at 4:09 pm | No comments | Reviews

Andrew NorelliIf Andrew Norelli raced for a living, he’d drive a dragster instead of an Indy car. Hey, he prefers straight lines to curves. He seldom veers off the worn but proven path to laughs, but the skill to take the audience on an amusing ride from Point A to Point B makes Norelli an interesting and entertaining comedian.

On Cut Above Stupid, his new album from Uproar! Entertainment, he simplifies the complexities of life and injects mirth into the mundane. Consider him a comfort comedian for these discomfiting days.

Like many of us, Norelli just wants the idiots to stop asking dumb questions, customer care associates to provide more than lip service and the technobrats to log off for one !#@!* second to allow the 2G stragglers to catch up to the 4G lead pack.

“I could figure out how to double space on Microsoft Word, if you’d stop touching it. I had it,” he grouses about the constantly updated software. Yes, he may be in character, but if so, Norelli sure acts haggard well. Without looking at life through morose-colored glasses, he sees the humor in the quotidian quirks, the family and celebrity twaddle that commoners ignore or miss. Really, he sounds like a guy who needs a nap or a beer, but please, no massage— too stressful (listen below).

Norelli delivers hilarious insight into these precarious times, when we wish clubs had a four-drink minimum to help us swallow the uncertainty. At the end of track No. 6, “The SAT Test,” Norelli slams the affluent bellyacher who chafes at the unfairness of suddenly being “boatless.”

“You know those people,” he continues, “[who] say they’re broke, then you see their ATM receipt. ‘What do mean you’re broke? Dude, you’ve got a comma.’” Rich, Norelli, rich.

Buy A Cut Above Stupid on iTunes or click the image below.

About the Author

John Delery

John Delery has written thousands of articles and millions of words in his career, and still he has professional goals: He wants "Be honest with me, Doc: Will I ever tweet again?" to someday supplant "Take my wife...please" as the Great American punch line.

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