No joke: Tracy Morgan pulls off dramatic role in “Son Of No One”

By | November 7, 2011 at 11:31 am | No comments | Reviews, TV/Movies | Tags: , , , ,

Most people in the entertainment industry acknowledge that it’s harder to do comedy than drama. But when you’re used to being funny, sometimes it’s hard to be serious– or to be taken seriously. Richard Belzer crossed over successfully in his work on television as Det. John Munch, a role he first brought to life on Tom Fontana’s Homicide: Life On The Street, and then carried over to Law and Order: Special Victims Unit, where he recently did his 300th episode.

Comedian Tracy Morgan does it in the new Dito Montiel film, The Son Of No One, an exciting police drama that opened on Friday with an all-star cast including Al Pacino, Channing Tatum, Katie Holmes, Ray Liotta and Juliette Binoche. Tatum plays a cop named Jon White, with a secret in his past that’s threatening to ruin his life. As a young kid of maybe 10 or 12 years old, he accidentally killed two low-life drug dealers in separate incidents. One incident was to save his own life, and the other looked to be just an accident in trying to save the life of his dog Charlie. But someone knew and waited all these years to expose him.

Now he gets transferred to a precinct in Staten Island to re-open this long closed “double murder” case, basically investigating his own crime. Someone is writing letters to a newspaper threatening to expose the killer. The columnist of the local paper who’s printing the letters is played by Binoche. Tatum’s character suspects his emotionally and mentally challenged childhood friend from the projects in which he lived, Vincent Carter, played as an adult by Morgan. Vincent had made a solemn promise never to tell what he had seen. You can check out the film’s trailer below:

The dynamic between the two old friends is very powerful, as is what transpires, leading to the ending of the film. Not only did Tracy capture the essence of the character, he got one of the only positive reviews from film critic Lou Lumenick of the New York Post. So go and see this film and decide for yourself! I liked it and I think you will too!

For more info and photos, go to the Comedy Matters Blog.

About the Author

Jeffrey Gurian

Jeffrey Gurian is a comedy writer who has written for lots of big names, and is currently writing the book on the 35 year history of The Comic Strip. Contact Jeffrey at Jeffrey@jeffreygurian.com.