Bridesmaids and other comedies will represent strong at the Oscars

By | January 24, 2012 at 11:37 pm | 14 comments | feature slider, News, TV/Movies | Tags: , ,

And the Oscar for Best Actress goes to…Kristen Wiig! Best Actor…Patton Oswalt! Best Picture…Bridesmaids! Or so we wish. The Oscar nominations came in this morning and it was a great year for comedy in film! This year, the Academy will recognize many comedic talents who are often overlooked during awards season.

It was an especially huge morning for the Judd Apatow-produced Bridesmaids, a movie about a female bro-mance (‘sisterhood’ without the militancy) that had women swearing at flight attendants and defecating in wedding dresses. Comedienne Melissa McCarthy was nominated for Best Supporting Actress, a shock to many awards bloggers (but not to the comedy community). In an exciting addition, Annie Mumolo and Kristen Wiig were nominated for Best Original Screenplay. It looks like we all will get another opportunity to see these badass ladies dressed up together again. I know I will finally watch that hour-long red carpet event this year, a time I usually reserved for Sudoku and wondering why the sky was blue.

Also with a nomination in a major category was funnyman Jonah Hill for his portrayal of Peter Brand in Moneyball. Hill plays the numbers-crunching Yale graduate who helped Oakland A’s general manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) transform a losing baseball team into a winning franchise. In addition to an excellent acting job, Hill served as crucial comedic relief to an otherwise serious film.

More hilarious people should be in attendance at the Kodak Theatre on Feb. 26th. Among the Best Animated Feature nominees are Puss in Boots and Kung Fu Panda 2. Puss featured alt comedy giant Zach Galifianakis as the voice for Humpty Dumpty. Kung Fu Panda 2 had several comedians voicing major rolls in addition to Jack Black‘s return as the karate-chopping panda, Po. David Cross voiced Crane, Seth Rogen voiced Mantis and Danny McBride voiced Wolf Bass.

This year’s Best Original Song category boasts only two nominees this year, a rare low. One of the two songs up for the award is “Man or Muppet” from this Fall’s The Muppets. We will certainly be excited to see Jason Segel singing at this year’s awards ceremony as he contemplates his manhood (or muppethood).

The Academy tends to favor more “serious” movies, so it’s great to see a slapstick comedy/musical have a very legitimate chance of winning the highly-coveted award for Best Picture. Silent film The Artist, which won the Golden Globe for Best Comedy or Musical Feature, would be a significant move towards comedic films being recognized for their capability to mix in jokes as well as character development, storyline, production and all of those other fancy things that go into making an amazing movie.

All of this year’s comedy nominees have made Hollywood realize that it’s time to take funny people seriously! Tune in Sunday, Feb. 26 at 7 pm EST for the 84th Annual Academy Awards on ABC with host Billy Crystal!

UPDATE:

My apologies for leaving out Woody Allen’s Midnight In Paris. The film that transports an engaged Owen Wilson to the 1920s every night while on vacation in Paris earned four nominations: Best Original Screenplay, Best Director, Best Art Direction and Best Picture, to which the writer-director is nominated for two. Come awards season, (as I fallaciously did myself) the Academy tends to forget about Allen in February. It seems every other year he’s nominated for writing and/or directing, but he has not won an Oscar since Hannah and Her Sisters (1987) for his screenplay.

He’s been nominated for 23 Academy Awards– 15 for writing, seven for directing, and he snagged a Best Actor nod for Annie Hall. Midnight in Paris won the Best Original Screenplay Golden Globe, an awards ceremony that sheds some speculative light on the Oscars. So maybe this year will be the one for Allen. Although I’m not sure it will change his prolific output of films.

About the Author

Billy Procida

Billy is a stand-up comedian in New York City. He believes that Andy Kaufman is still alive, living undercover as Amanda Bynes. Follow Billy on Twitter: @TheBillyProcida

  • Jacob

    How are you going to post an article on the comedic prsence in this year’s Oscar ceremony and not even mention Woody Allen? His film, Midnight in Paris, is nominated for 4 Oscars, icluding bestpicure, best director, and best original screenplay. While it is not a broad comedy like Bridesmaids, it is a great comedic movie. It is a shame you failed to recognize Woody.

  • Jacob

    How are you going to post an article on the comedic prsence in this year’s Oscar ceremony and not even mention Woody Allen? His film, Midnight in Paris, is nominated for 4 Oscars, icluding bestpicure, best director, and best original screenplay. While it is not a broad comedy like Bridesmaids, it is a great comedic movie. It is a shame you failed to recognize Woody.

  • Hank123

    I agree on the Woody front.

    On a completely different note, I think the overall nominations this year are an even bigger shame. I apologize in advance, but Kristen Wigg and Melissa McCarthy do not deserve Academy award nominations. I like them both but this is a joke. Yes, the “comedy community” is happy (whatever that actually is), but who cares? The nominations are not supposed to make people happy. They’re supposed to represent the best of the best. If you honestly believe McCarthy deserved to be nominated, then you believe that of every movie released this past year, she gave ONE OF THE FIVE BEST performances by a woman in a supporting role. That’s simply not true, and if you argue that it is true, then you are being incredibly subjective. Yes, both film and comedy are arts, and to that end, you cannot be absolutely objective. But the Academy must have standards. And this year’s nominations are horrendous. Throw in the fact that Fassbender and Gosling didn’t get nominations, Tree of Life and Extremely Loud did, and you have one of the most offensive list of nominations I’ve ever seen. What a horrible day for film.

  • Hank123

    I agree on the Woody front.

    On a completely different note, I think the overall nominations this year are an even bigger shame. I apologize in advance, but Kristen Wigg and Melissa McCarthy do not deserve Academy award nominations. I like them both but this is a joke. Yes, the “comedy community” is happy (whatever that actually is), but who cares? The nominations are not supposed to make people happy. They’re supposed to represent the best of the best. If you honestly believe McCarthy deserved to be nominated, then you believe that of every movie released this past year, she gave ONE OF THE FIVE BEST performances by a woman in a supporting role. That’s simply not true, and if you argue that it is true, then you are being incredibly subjective. Yes, both film and comedy are arts, and to that end, you cannot be absolutely objective. But the Academy must have standards. And this year’s nominations are horrendous. Throw in the fact that Fassbender and Gosling didn’t get nominations, Tree of Life and Extremely Loud did, and you have one of the most offensive list of nominations I’ve ever seen. What a horrible day for film.

  • Hank123

    I agree on the Woody front.

    On a completely different note, I think the overall nominations this year are an even bigger shame. I apologize in advance, but Kristen Wigg and Melissa McCarthy do not deserve Academy award nominations. I like them both but this is a joke. Yes, the “comedy community” is happy (whatever that actually is), but who cares? The nominations are not supposed to make people happy. They’re supposed to represent the best of the best. If you honestly believe McCarthy deserved to be nominated, then you believe that of every movie released this past year, she gave ONE OF THE FIVE BEST performances by a woman in a supporting role. That’s simply not true, and if you argue that it is true, then you are being incredibly subjective. Yes, both film and comedy are arts, and to that end, you cannot be absolutely objective. But the Academy must have standards. And this year’s nominations are horrendous. Throw in the fact that Fassbender and Gosling didn’t get nominations, Tree of Life and Extremely Loud did, and you have one of the most offensive list of nominations I’ve ever seen. What a horrible day for film.

    • Ryan

      You’re just completely discounting the talent that it takes to act in a comedy just like the academy has for years. If the woman isn’t crying in two or three scenes, it isn’t heavy enough for you and not a worthy performance. Ridiculous.

      • Hank123

        Ryan, that is an utter mischaracterization of my argument. Acting in a comedy takes just as much talent as acting in a drama. Look at Marilyn Monroe: one of the greatest actresses ever, and she did it in comedies. I have no problem with comedic films generating nominations. What I’m saying, though, is that McCarthy and Wiig are simply not worthy in this particular instance. Their work is not representative of the best of the best of 2011. It’s just not. I think comedy fans are letting their subjectivity get in the way of their ability to view this issue. They see Bridesmaids as ushering in a new generation of respect for comedy. And that’s great. I enjoyed Bridesmaids. But if we’re honest with ourselves, nothing in that film is Oscar-worthy. Yes, that is my personal opinion, but again, if people try as I have to view this issue as objectively as possible, I think they have to agree with me.

      • Hank123

        Ryan, that is an utter mischaracterization of my argument. Acting in a comedy takes just as much talent as acting in a drama. Look at Marilyn Monroe: one of the greatest actresses ever, and she did it in comedies. I have no problem with comedic films generating nominations. What I’m saying, though, is that McCarthy and Wiig are simply not worthy in this particular instance. Their work is not representative of the best of the best of 2011. It’s just not. I think comedy fans are letting their subjectivity get in the way of their ability to view this issue. They see Bridesmaids as ushering in a new generation of respect for comedy. And that’s great. I enjoyed Bridesmaids. But if we’re honest with ourselves, nothing in that film is Oscar-worthy. Yes, that is my personal opinion, but again, if people try as I have to view this issue as objectively as possible, I think they have to agree with me.

        • Ryan

          I disagree that anyone is being dishonest with themselves about the film being oscar-worthy, I think it’s nice to see my favorite film of the year get a little bit of recognition because broad comedies are rarely seen as worthy of even faint praise when the oscars are concerned. I am not just saying this as a fan of comedy who thinks that it’s nice to see a comedy get comedy nominations, I say it as someone who thinks that it’s better than half the films nominated for best picture overall. Also, McCarthy was the stand out performance in that film and was absolutely hilarious, so I think she deserves to win, but will obviously not. Lastly, you need to stop including Wiig in your argument who was not recognized for her acting but for the screenplay, which is the usual category where they throw a bone to the comedies of the year.

          • Ryan

            I mean, to see a comedy get oscar nominations.

          • Hank

            But Ryan, don’t you see how subjective you’re being in this argument when you say, “I think it’s nice to see my favorite film of the year get a little bit of recognition”? It’s not about favorites, and Bridesmaids did get recognition in the form of critical acclaim and box office receipts. But it is, again, not an Oscar-worthy film simply because it was good and funny and because you liked it. As well, just because McCarthy is the stand-out performance (a point I do not deny) does not itself mean that she deserves a nomination. Finally, I include Wiig because her writing did not merit Oscar consideration, either. The whole film doesn’t. It’s a very good film. I don’t argue against that. But it’s not up there with the all-time greats, which is what being considered for an Oscar inherently implies. 

          • Hank

            But Ryan, don’t you see how subjective you’re being in this argument when you say, “I think it’s nice to see my favorite film of the year get a little bit of recognition”? It’s not about favorites, and Bridesmaids did get recognition in the form of critical acclaim and box office receipts. But it is, again, not an Oscar-worthy film simply because it was good and funny and because you liked it. As well, just because McCarthy is the stand-out performance (a point I do not deny) does not itself mean that she deserves a nomination. Finally, I include Wiig because her writing did not merit Oscar consideration, either. The whole film doesn’t. It’s a very good film. I don’t argue against that. But it’s not up there with the all-time greats, which is what being considered for an Oscar inherently implies. 

          • Ryan

            Yes, I am being subjective, as are you, as is the academy. However, they don’t give certain kinds of movies a fair shake. That is all.

          • Ryan

            Yes, I am being subjective, as are you, as is the academy. However, they don’t give certain kinds of movies a fair shake. That is all.