Chris Rock talks Tosh, illegal taping at comedy clubs, Louis C.K. and more

By | August 1, 2012 at 2:57 pm | 3 comments | News | Tags: , ,

In a must-read interview with Dave Itzkoff of the New York Times, Chris Rock addresses the recent rash of unfortunate comedy club incidents, the problem with audience members illegally recording sets and much more. Check out an excerpt below, but make sure you read the entire thing. It’s worth your time, Laughspinners.

Q. Whether it’s your tweet, or Daniel Tosh joking about rape, or Tracy Morgan saying he’d kill his son if he came out to him, does it seem like the Internet is just adding more fuel to these fires?

A. Are they real fires? Or are people just reacting to something? Just because there’s an alarm going doesn’t mean it’s a fire. And I think that people are confusing the two. It’s only a fire when it offends the fans, and the fans turn on you. Tosh has fans, and they get the joke. If you’ve watched enough Tracy Morgan, you let the worst thing go by. When did Tracy Morgan become Walter Cronkite? You have to mean something to me to offend me. You can’t break up with me if we don’t date.

Q. You don’t think some kind of threshold has been crossed?

A. When you’re workshopping it, a lot of stuff is bumpy and awkward. Especially when you’re working on the edge, you’re going to offend. A guy like Tosh, he’s at the Laugh Factory. He’s making no money. He’s essentially in the gym. You’re mad at Ray Leonard because he’s not in shape, in the gym? That’s what the gym’s for. The sad thing, with all this taping and stuff, no one’s going to do stand-up. And every big stand-up I talk to says: “How do I work out new material? Where can you go, if I have a half an idea and then it’s on the Internet next week?” Just look at some of my material. You can’t imagine how rough it was and how unfunny and how sexist or racist it might have seemed. “Niggas vs. Black People” probably took me six months to get that thing right. You know how racist that thing was a week in? That’s not to be seen by anybody.

Q. What’s the solution?

A. Honestly, I’m just trying to figure out how I’m going to do it. ’Cause the few times I’ve gotten onstage and thought about touring, immediately, stuff’s on the Internet, I’m getting calls, and I’m like, this isn’t worth it. I saw “Dark Knight [Rises]” the other night, and Bruce Wayne’s walking into this party, and he presses a button, and no one’s camera works. If I find a comedy club where no one’s camera works, I’ll go. I’ll go back to comedy clubs when they get a real no-camera policy, the same way they did with smoking. But hey, they used to be the smokiest places in the world.

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  • Noah Odabashian

    I applaud this man.

  • GreatKimaugh

    I work at a comedy club. We warn everybody about cameras – and actively stop people who take photos or even raise their phone towards the stage. Tell them to take it to the bar. Dunno about other clubs.

  • christopatten

    Chris Rock did an awesome job of bringing an aspect of this issue into the forefront. The idea that people are running with half baked materials. keep it real Mr. Rock.