Jimmy Fallon builds a joke empire Breaking Bad style (Video)

By | September 12, 2013 at 4:42 pm | One comment | Comedy Briefs, TV/Movies | Tags: , ,

As the hit AMC series Breaking Bad winds down to its series finale, plenty of fun has been had with the concept of a straight-laced cancer patient turning to the dark side and beginning a large-scale meth empire. Last night on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, the heir to the Tonight Show throne admitted to his own underworld empire: selling jokes. Can Jimmy get away with it with his brother-in-law hot on his trail? What evil comedic mastermind could possibly be out to get our beloved anti-hero? Watch Joking Bad to find out. You’ll even see Bob Odenkirk (seriously, this guy is starting to pop up everywhere) reprise his Saul Goodman character for a moment.

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Billy Procida

Billy is a stand-up comedian in New York City. Every week he sits down with a chick he's hooked up with to talk about sex, dating, and sexuality on The Manwhore Podcast: A Sex-Positive Quest for Love. Follow Billy on Twitter: @TheBillyProcida

  • Steven Kilpatrick

    I loved this video because it plays it so seriously that the comedy emerges from that. However, I’m pretty sure the funniest moment still came from the Breaking Bad writer’s room (the pizza).

    It’s not that I dislike Jimmy, but it’s just that no late night talk show has ever, in my mind, produced “98% pure jokes” in more than the smallest quantities.

    When I listen to stand-up after stand-up talk about how a late night show neutered their act, I have a tough time equating it with the edge that Breaking Bad brings to the table.

    I would love to see the same video, but made for internet only, and have some of those jokes actually bring out the edge that “Kim Kardashian does have a round buttocks” just doesn’t.

    At which point are we watching a high budget vine video and at which point are we watching comedy?

    Maybe I’m thinking too deeply about a toss off NBC sketch–but it failed where Breaking Bad succeeds. It refused to be more than we expected going in.